CERTIFICATE

PSYCHOANALYTIC ENCOUNTER:
CONFLICT AND CHANGE

5 - 8 February 2020

ISCTE-IUL

XXI International Forum of Psychoanalysis | 5 - 8 February

ISCTE - University Institute of Lisbon

What is the role of the Analyst and what can he do to facilitate the mental growth of his patient?
What is the importance of the setting? What is the importance of a timely interpretation?

The International Federation of Psychoanalytic Societies holds a Forum every two years hosted by member societies, providing an opportunity for inspiring dialogue amongst an international community of psychoanalysts. The next Forum of The International Federation of Psychoanalytic Societies (IFPS) will be hosted by:

AP – Associação Portuguesa de Psicanálise e Psicoterapia Psicanalítica

THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENCOUNTER: CONFLICT AND CHANGE will reflect about global, relational and individual aspects of theoretical and clinical perspectives related to the psychoanalytic process.

Consider this: Two people meet twice a week at a certain hour on a certain day in a certain place - to talk.

One of them is called the Analysand and will lie on a couch. The other, whom we’ll call the Analyst, sits a little behind. There’s no eye to eye contact except (perhaps) when the Analysand arrives and leaves. The Analyst expects the Analysand to follow the basic rules of psychoanalysis as defined by Freud 100 years ago and so does the Analysand, who is supposed to be informed about them.

At first, they’ll know very little of each other, if anything at all. They’ll greet each other, lie down and seat, respectively, and start talking - or not.

What is taking place in this mysterious meeting that we call the psychoanalytical encounter?

The roles of the Analyst and of the Analysand are very different, in some basic aspects, as are for sure their expectations and stances. However, as the psychoanalytical process goes on, their encounter has to be meaningful and allow for the the growth, the expansion of the mind of the Analysand and of the Analyst. Sometimes the process fails and Analyst and Analysand collude into some pathological illusion, which we’ve designated by delusion. This can result from several unfortunate factors, which will certainly be discussed in our Forum.

When the process goes well – or as Bion put it “do the best with a bad result” – after a while, there won’t be in that room only two entities, but three. We can designate this other entity by many names, like the Analytical Third, for instance. The existence of this third entity is also a condition for the growth of the mind, as we see it. Another issue for fruitful discussion during our Forum.

We’d like to know your thoughts about the Psychoanalytical Encounter, which has been viewed from very different perspectives since Freud created this discipline.

What is the role of the Analyst and what can he do to facilitate the mental growth of his patient?

What is the importance of the setting? What is the importance of a timely interpretation?

What about empathy and projective identifications? What about resistances and countertransference?

As for the patient, what kind of role can he have under those special circumstances he finds himself in, struggling to be, as the poet put it, the “captain of his soul”?

And the outer reality, how does it play in this sui generis encounter of two humans, body and mind, citizens living in community? And how does this meeting, besides the qualitative change of the participants, also transform this community and the collective experience, recreating the sustainability of Polis?

Please encourage your colleagues to attend our XXI IFPS Forum in Lisboa. We look forward to our international colleagues participating along with our Portuguese colleagues.